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Australian Wildlife

  Sydney Brown Trapdoor Spider (Misgolas rapax)





Sydney Brown Trapdoor Spider | Misgolas rapax photo
Sydney brown trapdoor spider in Kurrajong, New South Wales

Image by Johan C.G. Fagerholm - Some rights reserved.    (view image details)

Sydney Brown Trapdoor Spider | Misgolas rapax photo
Male Sydney brown trapdoor spider

Image by Johan C.G. Fagerholm - GNU Free Documentation License.    (view image details)

Sydney Brown Trapdoor Spider | Misgolas rapax photo
female Sydney brown trapdoor spider

Image by Johan C.G. Fagerholm - GNU Free Documentation License.    (view image details)



SPIDER FACTS

Description
The Sydney Brown Trapdoor Spider is a medium-to-large trapdoor spider. Females are larger than males, and more stocky in build. They are chocolate brown in colour and males have boxing glove-shaped palps at the front of the head between the first pair of legs. The body and legs are covered in tiny hairs. They are shy spiders and spend most of the time in their burrows. At night, they wait for food in front of their burrows. The brown trapdoor is often confused with the far more dangerous Sydney Funnel-web. The trapdoor can be distinguished by its chocolate brown colour and less stocky body. Brown trapdoors are shy and timid compared to the aggressive Funnel-webs.

Size
Body length: males 20mm, females 35mm

Habitat
Sydney Brown Trapdoors spiders dig an open burrow in the ground and line it with silk. The burrow may reach 25cm long and around 25mm in width. Brown trapdoors often have silk trip lines radiating from the burrow entrance. They use the burrows for protection, and to raise their young.

Food
Trapdoor spiders eat insects and other invertebrates. The spider waits just inside the burrow entrance and pounces on any prey that walks past. It injecting the prey with venom and drags it down the burrow to feed.

Breeding
During the breeding season, male trapdoor spiders leave their burrows and go in search of a mate during humid weather. Mating takes place in the female's burrow. The female produces an egg sac which she keeps in her burrow. After hatching, the spiderlings stay in the burrow for some time and then disperse to fend for themselves.

Range
found mainly around Sydney

Notes
Sydney Brown Trapdoor Spiders are often mistaken for Funnel-webs, but the bite of the brown trapdoor is not dangerous, although it may cause local pain and swelling. Although not aggressive, they will show their fangs if harassed.



Classification
Class:Arachnida
Order:Mygalomorphae
Family:Idiopidae
Genus:Misgolas
Species:rapax
Common Name:Sydney Brown Trapdoor Spider