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Australian Wildlife

  Apostlebird (Struthidea cinerea)





Apostlebird | Struthidea cinerea photo
Apostlebird (Struthidea cinerea) in Australia

Image by Rob and Stephanie Levy - Some rights reserved.    (view image details)

Apostlebird | Struthidea cinerea photo
Group of four Apostlebirds at a rest stop on the Barrier Highway, western New South Wales, Australia

Image by David Woodward - Some rights reserved.    (view image details)



APOSTLEBIRD FACTS

Description
The Apostlebird is a dark grey bird with brown wings and black tail. They are communal birds often seen in groups of six to ten birds. They can become quite tame around farms and around camp sites. The common name comes from its communal living habit - after the Twelve Apostles.

Other Names
Grey Jumper

Size
31cm

Habitat
open dry forests and woodlands near water. Also farmland with trees, large parks, orchards.

Food
seeds and plants, insects and other invertebrates.

Breeding
Apostlebirds form a breeding group of about ten birds. The group has a dominant male and several females and young birds. The nest is a large bowl made of mud and lined with grass, built on a horizontal branch 3m - 20m above the ground. Two to five eggs are laid in a clutch.

Range
eastern Australia in inland areas from Cape York Peninsula, Queensland to northern Victoria and into eastern parts of South Australia.



Classification
Class:Aves
Order:Passeriformes
Family:Corcoracidae
Genus:Struthidea
Species:cinerea
Common Name:Apostlebird