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Australian Wildlife

  Potter Wasp (Abispa ephippium)





Potter Wasp | Abispa ephippium photo
Potter Wasp on gutter of house

Photograph copyright: ozwildlife - all rights reserved. Used with permission.

Potter Wasp | Abispa ephippium photo
Potter Wasp in flight. The legs hang down when in flight.

Photograph copyright: ozwildlife - all rights reserved. Used with permission.

Potter Wasp | Abispa ephippium photo
Australian hornet

Image by Arthur Chapman - Some rights reserved.    (view image details)



POTTER WASP FACTS

Identification
The Potter Wasp is a large wasp. The abdomen is orange and black, and the thorax is black with orange triangle at the shoulders. The antenna and legs are orange-yellow. Potter Wasps are solitary and build a mud pot-shaped nest attached to a tree trunk or side of a building. They can sting but are not aggressive.

Size
30mm

Habitat
often seen in gardens searching for caterpillars on leaves on trees and shrubs, or collecting mud from damp soil or roof gutters

Food
larvae feed on caterpillars

Breeding
Females build a mud nest with many cells. She lays an egg inside each cell and encloses a caterpillar in the cell for the developing wasp larva to feed on. The larva pupates in the mud nest and emerges as an adult wasp.



Classification
Class:Insecta
Order:Hymenoptera
Family:Vespidae
Genus:Abispa
Species:ephippium
Common Name:Potter Wasp